Reading through confusion

old-person-confusedRight now there are several books dazed with how poorly I’m doing at giving them my attention. I still owe time to Oliver Sacks’, “Musicophilia”, I picked up on this book last week and I’m

Oliver Sacks
Oliver Sacks

nearly half way through. I’ve whiled away on this book enjoying his writing about an assortment of patients dealing with assortments of neurological disorders. Many of his descriptions sound too much like things I experience across the days, weeks and months of each year. Being told of others who, like me, know what it’s like to smell something odd in just one nostril feels good. None of us wish these things one one another and it is still comforting to know of others who feel some of what the rest of us sense from time to time.

Paolo Bacigalupi
Paolo Bacigalupi

Paolo Bacigalupi’s, “Pump Six and Other Stories”, is my followup to his, “The Windup Girl.” It has been sitting patiently on my iPhone for months now, awaiting my drawing a few other things over the finish line. Like I often carry on about my daughter has read his, “The Fluted Girl” and has been carrying on with her high school students about her father’s pleasure in reading, “The Windup Girl.”

Michael Gazzaniga
Michael Gazzaniga

I finished listening to Michael Gazzaniga’s “Who’s in Charge?”, nearly a month ago, but failed to end my thirst for quotes and a cluster words I like from his book. For someone like me, this book is enjoyable because of his efforts at offering suggestions and his own views on how human thought happens. Given his being a Nobel Laureate in neuroscience his work has been well worth the time I have already and still have to put into finishing it out as I like.

Percy Walker
Percy Walker

Walker Percy’s, “Lost in the Cosmos” is proving to be the least enjoyed of this past year. While I still have a little less than half of his work to read, I’ve come to the conclusion that my only reason is to see if he can change my mind!

John Brockman
John Brockman

Now, John Brockman’s, “This Will Make You Smarter” has proven to be one of those works I can securely take my time in. Each chapter is between one to three pages in length. Across those 448 pages are a wondrously rich assortment of this worlds current thinkers. Among those thinkers are the likes of Max Tegmark, Marcelo Gleiser and George Church of whom I have read other works by each.

Robert Trivers
Robert Trivers

Robert Trivers, “The Folly of Fools” is a work I set out to read nearly two years ago and never finished. I failed to bring his work to a sincere finish because several other books focused in on altruism nabbed all of my attention. For those of you who know me, don’t let your snicker become too loud over that. My distractibility, though, is a frustrating part of my life. Neural damage and lacking a part of my brain gives me gives me a true sense of what Trivers and several others in this past year’s reading wrote about.

Trivers’ work snagged me because of his pushing forward a psychosocial dynamic which isn’t given sufficient attention. Our conversations within and among ourselves are not as truthful. Robert drew out something I hold dear. We do not know how well fabricated our internal and external conversations are. I’ve ladled enough on this for now.

Alex Bracken
Alex Bracken

Honestly, I’m too attached to Alexandra Bracken, like I am to my daughter. Ms. Bracken’s, “Never Fade: Darkest Minds, book 2” was to have been cracked open in during the course of this past fall. It wasn’t. Early in 2014, I caught the scent of her first book and grabbed it. Alex, you took hold of me with Ruby, in “Darkest Minds” and as that teenage shifted, ran and changed deeply through the course of your first book, I became addicted. You moved me in fashions that few of my own work experiences didn’t. Dear, I’ve professionally dealt with a few people closer to what Stieg Larsson used in his books. Nonetheless, you did nail me into you book.

Jacque Ellul
Jacque Ellul

Finally, there is Jacque Ellul and his work, “The Ethics of Freedom”. I have fumbled around with this book for several years, reading only the first 50 or so pages over that time. So Jacque, I’ve committed myself to finishing this one within this year.

Several years ago, I finished your “False Presence of the Kingdom” and definitely enjoyed it. I know, I will like this book as well, but its’ density makes lead feel light.

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